Serving Older Adults in Metro Atlanta Since 1980


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Archive for September 2016

“You don't stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing.” ― George Bernard Shaw

The Silver Tsunami – An Unprecedented Societal Shift

Written By: Weyman Perry
Weyman Perry

Weyman Perry

Recipe for a Perfect Storm. . . Take a POPULATION GROWTH bomb and mix it with…. A dramatically INCREASING LIFESPAN.

Our World is Getting Older
From now on, population growth comes from more elders and middle aged people than from infants. By 2050 we will move from 1 in 5 people being older than 60 to 1 in 3 on our planet.

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Celebrated Centenarian – Mozelle Blair

Majorie Mozelle Blair was born in 1915 in Cornelia, Georgia. The oldest of five children, she lived in Cornelia, Georgia until moving to Young Harris to attend Young Harris College. She graduated with a degree in education and began work as a fourth grade teacher.

In 1943 Ms. Blair moved to Atlanta to begin work as a secretary at Coca-Cola. Ms. Blair spent 37 years working for Coca-Cola, retiring in 1980. During her 37 year employment at Coca-Cola she saw many changes in the workplace, most notably how women were treated compared to men. She remembers being allowed to wear pants to work and when Coke began hiring females to work in traditionally male dominated positions.

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Celebrated Centenarian – Claire Taylor

Claire Clark (Taylor) was born in Hastings, Nebraska, on October 27, 1914. She spent most of her school years in Eugene, Oregon, where her father was pastor of a church closely linked to the university. Her mother served as chair of the music department. Claire began her first job there, playing the organ for church at the age of eleven. This was a skill that served her well, as she attended Grinnell College during the Depression and was able to fund her tuition with a church job.

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Celebrated Centenarian – Evelyn Emanuel

written by: Weyman Perry and Danielle Grabol

Evelyn Emanuel was born on October 6, 1915, in Scranton, PA. She was one of three girls in her family and she was the middle daughter. They moved to the Virginia Beach area when she was very young and that is where she spent most of her life.

When Evelyn graduated from high school, the country was just coming out of the Great Depression. Jobs were scarce and there certainly wasn’t money available for many people to attend college. She worked for a while for a group of four attorneys and she had a job selling maps over the telephone. Most of her adult life, however, was spent being a wife and mother.

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Employee Retention

Employees are the lifeblood of any service related business and especially businesses like Personal Care, Inc. that deliver healthcare related services. The benefits of having high quality, enthusiastic, professional employees is obvious to every business but just recognizing that fact does not mean a business is able to successfully build such an environment for its workforce.

There are many factors involved in creating a working environment that results in employees that are quality minded, enthusiastic about their work and professional in their approach to customers and to one another. The “recipe” for such a workplace is not quick and easy. In fact, the opposite is often true. Such an environment requires a commitment of both personal and financial resources from the company in order to have associates who are unified in their commitment to excellence and compassion in the work that they do.

The downside of high employee turnover has been widely documented – low company morale; increased cost for recruitment; interviewing and onboarding; loss of customers due to inconsistent service delivery; difficulty establishing and maintaining a consistent company culture; and lower overall earnings for the organization. All of these factors make it difficult for an organization to maintain stability in the community it serves.

The Home Care Services industry has seen markedly increasing turnover rates nationwide over the last 5-7 years. In 2014 a nationally focused Home Care Quality Organization reported results of a survey of over 700 home care organizations. The results were striking in that the average annual turnover rate for the clinical staff of a home care service companies was over 60%! There are numerous reasons for this turnover – suffice it to say this type of trend does not bode well for these organizations.

PERSONAL CARE has a long standing culture of sincere concern for its employees. This was the foundation of the business when it was established in 1980 and continues to be a core pillar of the organization’s priorities today.

This foundational commitment to employees was evidenced once again as PERSONAL CARE recently became one of the first home care services companies to offer its employees health benefits along with 401K options and paid time off. While this array of benefits seems rudimentary for employees in many industries, it is truly unique in an industry characterized by 1099 and part time contracted employees. Our hope and belief is that this ongoing investment in the employees of PERSONAL CARE will continue to result in a more experienced care delivery team, that is better trained, more professional and more enthusiastic in the provision of care to our clients and families. Employees are the lifeblood of any service related business and especially businesses like Personal Care, Inc. that deliver healthcare related services. The benefits of having high quality, enthusiastic, professional employees is obvious to every business but just recognizing that fact does not mean a business is able to successfully build such an environment for its workforce.

There are many factors involved in creating a working environment that results in employees that are quality minded, enthusiastic about their work and professional in their approach to customers and to one another. The “recipe” for such a workplace is not quick and easy. In fact, the opposite is often true. Such an environment requires a commitment of both personal and financial resources from the company in order to have associates who are unified in their commitment to excellence and compassion in the work that they do.

The downside of high employee turnover has been widely documented – low company morale; increased cost for recruitment; interviewing and onboarding; loss of customers due to inconsistent service delivery; difficulty establishing and maintaining a consistent company culture; and lower overall earnings for the organization.

All of these factors make it difficult for an organization to maintain stability in the community it serves. The Home Care Services industry has seen markedly increasing turnover rates nationwide over the last 5-7 years. In 2014 a nationally focused Home Care Quality Organization reported results of a survey of over 700 home care organizations. The results were striking in that the average annual turnover rate for the clinical staff of a home care service companies was over 60%! There are numerous reasons for this turnover – suffice it to say this type of trend does not bode well for these organizations.

PERSONAL CARE has a long standing culture of sincere concern for its employees. This was the foundation of the business when it was established in 1980 and continues to be a core pillar of the organization’s priorities today. This foundational commitment to employees was evidenced once again as PERSONAL CARE recently became one of the first home care services companies to offer its employees health benefits along with 401K options and paid time off. While this array of benefits seems rudimentary for employees in many industries, it is truly unique in an industry characterized by 1099 and part time contracted employees. Our hope and belief is that this ongoing investment in the employees of PERSONAL CARE will continue to result in a more experienced care delivery team, that is better trained, more professional and more enthusiastic in the provision of care to our clients and families. weyman

written by: Weyman Perry
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